An Officer and a Gentleman: Roger (or Rowland) Atcherley

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ATCHERLEY.—INFORMATION is requested concerning ROGER (otherwise ROWLAND) ATCHERLEY, an officer, first in the Marines and later in the Militia, who died about 1833. He is believed to have been born about 1775, and was educated at Shrewsbury, under Dr. J. Atcherley, who it has been supposed was his uncle.

I am always pleased to receive requests for information about members of the Atcherley family. Fortunately I was already familiar with Roger (a.k.a. Rowland) Atcherley before the above enquiry came my way. Having since carried out some further research and followed up the interesting leads regarding his military service, I am now in a position to provide a report. The enquirer, I know, will not object to me sharing it with the wider world through this website.

Roger Atcherley was baptised at Kinnerley in Shropshire on 1 September 1771, the third of four sons born to Richard Atcherley and his wife Eliza Oliver. The baptism records for Richard and Eliza’s first three sons show that Richard was a gentleman, who lived at Edgerley, a township within Kinnerley parish. Sadly, the entry in the baptism record for the couple’s fourth and last son, dated 29 March 1773, reads “Richard Son of Elizabeth Atcherley of Edgerley by her late Husband”. Richard Atcherley senior had been buried just over a month earlier, on 21 February.

So Roger grew up with, at best, only dim memories of his father. Was he educated at Shrewsbury school? It is entirely possible, but unfortunately we cannot be certain one way or the other. This is because the register of admissions to the school for the period in question was lost. The disappearance of the register took place during the headmastership of the Reverend James Atcherley during his tenure from 1771 until 1798.

James Atcherley of Shrewsbury was not Roger’s uncle, but I believe he was a first cousin once removed of Roger. Given this relationship, Roger may well have known the Reverend Atcherley even if he did not attend Shrewsbury School – and this raises an interesting possibility. James’s most famous son was another James Atcherley, who in 1794 became a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Marines (see An Atcherley at Trafalgar). This was at a time when Britain was at war with revolutionary France and fearful of invasion. Defence forces were being expanded on both land and sea. Roger Atcherley’s own patriotic desire to help defend his country may alone have been enough to make him join the armed forces, but it is a tempting thought that he may have been influenced – if only when choosing which service to join – by the example set by his second cousin James Atcherley.

The List of the Officers of the Army and Marines, published in 1800, included entries for two men with the surname Atcherley, both officers of the Marine Forces. One was James, recorded as holding the rank of First Lieutenant from 24 April 1795. The other was named as Robert, who had been Commissioned as a Second Lieutenant on 2 May 1798. Since there were no members of the Atcherley named Robert living at that time, it seems likely that this was actually Roger. The List of the Officers of His Majesty’s Royal Marine Forces published in 1803 reinforces this view. The Atcherley it shows as a Second Lieutenant of the Marines with a Commission dated 2 May 1798 is named as Roger. He had been appointed to the 36th Company of the Marines on 1 June 1802 and was based with them at Plymouth (as was James, with the 33rd). However, the List of All the Officers of Army and Royal Marines on Full and Half-pay published in 1805 does not include Roger, only James (who was by then a Captain), so Roger had left the Service by then.

Regrettably, I have not been able to find any other information regarding Roger Atcherley’s life in the Royal Marines, or exactly how and when it ended. The Peace of Amiens in 1802 had lessened the fear of invasion and Roger may have resigned his Commission not long after the 1803 List of the Officers of His Majesty’s Royal Marine Forces was compiled. It appears that Roger then remained in Devon, settling at Newton Abbot in the parish of Wolborough. It is just possible therefore that he might have become a member of Haytor Regiment of Volunteer Infantry when it was formed, along with other Militia units across Devon (and beyond), in March 1803.

The King’s warrant to ‘draw out and embody’ the Militia was just one of the preparations Britain made before ditching the short-lived Peace of Amiens. Having entered into a treaty of peace with France, Britain had become concerned that it was simply giving France an opportunity to expand, without hindrance, its territory and power in Europe and the colonies. Being also distrustful of Bonaparte’s future ambitions, Britain decided to act pre-emptively. With preparations for both offence and defence underway, war on France was declared on 18 May 1803.

The Haytor Regiment, a thousand strong, was composed of several companies. Its duties were to watch for French incursions, and make preparations to take defensive action when the need arose, for which purpose the regiment “assembled for field-days and drill at various points in the district.” Reports of the regiments activities in the press included, in 1804, under the headline Port News: “Torbay, Sept. 28. [...] Two of the companies of the Haytor Hundred Volunteer Infantry marched into the barracks at Berry Head yesterday, to do duty there for three weeks, when they are to be relieved by two companies of the same regiment.”

Long after these times, in 1888, a Lieutenant-Colonel Amery recalled:

Many stories remain of this period of service. I cannot say how long the Volunteers were out; probably they relieved each other. One story frequently told was of the French fire-ships for which they were on the look-out, to be sent among the fleet in the bay, and which caused much stir. One night as the full moon rose red and fiery out of the sea the sentry at the headland, who had come from an inland parish, mistook it for a fire ship, discharged his musket, and aroused the garrison. The uniform was similar to the line regiments of the period, viz., scarlet swallow tailed coats, turned out with yellow, blue black breeches, white cross belts, with a brass plate having Haytor Regiment thereon; the pouches were black, the buttons had H.V.R.—Haytor Volunteer Regiment, officers wore cocked hats, others tall shakoes.

Amery also stated that the Haytors were disbanded about 1809, but there is evidence to show that the regiment continued for a few years beyond then. On 11 April 1810 for example, “the Haytor regiment of Volunteer Infantry, 970 strong, were inspected by Colonel Barne; after which they went through a field-day, under the command of Lieut.-colonel Babb”. In December of that year Lieutenant-Colonel Babb’s death was reported, and it was stated that “His brother officers, and the regiment, have lost a good friend”.  One of Babb’s brother officers was Roger, or, as he was by then known, Rowland Atcherley, whose marriage under that name, to Eliza Oliver, took place at Walcot in Somerset on 24 May 1810.

Just when – or why – Roger changed his given name is unknown, but clearly his moniker had morphed by 1810 and all records in which he mentioned after this time refer to him as Rowland (or R) Atcherley (or Atcherly). A letter which he wrote in his capacity as Adjutant of the Haytor Regiment on 18 July 1807 provides no help here, as this is said to have been written by “H. R. V. K. Atcherly” (probably Haytor Regiment of Volunteers, R. Atcherly). He was, incidentally, still Adjutant of the regiment in 1813 when his son – also named Rowland – was baptised at Wolborough. The baptismal records for the three children born to Rowland and Eliza after Rowland junior show the “Quality, Trade, or Profession” of the father as Gentleman. It looks likely that by 1814, Rowland Atcherley’s association with the Haytor Regiment was over.

There are a few additional records in which Rowland appears, adding to the evidence from the Wolborough baptism registers confirming that his residence until at least 1818 (when his last child was Christened) was Newton Abbot. From Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post we know that he purchased game duty certificates in 1812 (as R. Atcherly, gent, Woolborough) and 1814 (as Rowland Atcherly, esq. Woolborough). From the same newspaper, under the headline Extraordinary exertion, we learn that on 17 April 1817, at Newton Abbot, Rowland (referred to as a gentleman of the name of Atcherley) “undertook, for a wager of 5l. to walk six miles within the hour, upon 110 yards of ground, which he completed in forty-nine minutes, without once rising upon the run.”

At some point between 1818 and 1830 however, Rowland and his family moved to Exmouth, Pigot’s National Commercial Directory for the latter year listing him, under the Nobility, gentry & clergy of the town, as “Atcherley Rowland, gent. Parade.” It was not long before Rowland moved even further afield. Administration of his estate, following his death, was granted on the Isle of Man in 1838, a transcript posted online reading as follows:

Rowland Roger Atcherley On the sixteenth day Admon of the Goods Chattels and credits of Rowland Roger Atcherley formerly of Edgerley in the County of Salop afterwards of Exmouth in the County of Devon but late of Castle Town in the Isle of Man Esquire deceased was granted to Eliza Atcherley Widow the relict being first sworn duly to administer.

I believe, being all too familiar with the range of transcription errors the name Atcherley or Atcherly is subject to, that records of the burial of “Rowland Stoherly”, age given as 57, at Malew (the Manx parish including Castletown) on 26 August 1831, in fact relate to Rowland Atcherley’s interment.

So ends my report on the life of Roger, otherwise Rowland, Atcherley. Unfortunately, the person who made the enquiry which appears at the beginning of this article will not be able to read it. Giving his address as “A., post-office, Rivington, Chorley”, he was undoubtedly Rowland’s grandson Rowland John Atcherley. His request for information was printed in The Times of 4 April 1873, and he died 18 years later, on 8 September 1891. My response to his plea is, unavoidably, more than a century too late. I’m left wondering whether anyone from his own time was able to tell Rowland more about his grandfather, an officer and a gentleman who served his country, as Marine and Militia Man, in its time of need.


Picture credits. Kinnerley St Mary: adapted from image © copyright J Scott, taken from Geograph and used (and made available for re-use) under a Creative Commons Licence. Soldier in uniform of 9th Foot, 1812 (similar to the uniform of the Haytor Regiment): cropped and adapted from Encyclopaedia Britannica image, taken from Wikimedia Commons and in the public domain. Wolborough St Mary: adapted from image © copyright John Salmon, taken from Geograph and used (and made available for re-use) under a Creative Commons Licence. Map of Newton Abbot and surrounding area (including Berry Head and Exmouth): cropped and adapted from map on page 407 of ‘The Rivers of Devon from source to sea’, published 1893, taken from the British Library’s Flickr Photostream; no known copyright restrictions.


References

[1] The Times, issue 27655, 4 Apr 1873, page 1.
[2] Kinnerley, Shropshire baptism register covering 1771, entry for baptism of Roger Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast.
[3] Kinnerley, Shropshire baptism register covering 1767, entry for baptism of John Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast.
[4] Kinnerley, Shropshire baptism register covering 1769, entry for baptism of James Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast.
[5] Kinnerley, Shropshire baptism register covering 1773, entry for baptism of Richard Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast.
[6] Kinnerley, Shropshire parish register covering 1773, entry for burial of Richard Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast.
[7] George William Fisher, John Spencer Hill (1899), Annals of Shrewsbury School. Pages 254-5. Copy viewed at Internet Archive.
[8] Robert Holden Mackenzie (1913), The Trafalgar roll.
[9] Lieut.-Col. Amery (1888), The Haytor Volunteers: Their History and Development. Copy viewed at Internet Archive.
[10] War Office (1800), A List of the Officers of the Army and Marines. 48th Edition. Pages 391 and 398. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[11] Admiralty Office (1803), A List of the Officers of His Majesty’s Royal Marine Forces. Table 24. Pages 18 and 34. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[12] War Office (1805), A List of All the Officers of Army and Royal Marines on Full and Half-pay. Page 409. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[13] Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post, 30 Jun 1803, page 1.
[14] Christopher David Hall (1992), British Strategy in the Napoleonic War, 1803-15. Page 102 et seq. Preview copy viewed at Google Books.
[15] Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 1 Oct 1804, page 4.
[16] Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post, 26 Apr 1810, page 1.
[17] Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post, 20 Dec 1810, page 4.
[18] FreeREG shows marriage of Rowland Atcherley and Eliza Oliver.
[19] Devon & Cornwall Notes & Queries, Volume 23, 1949. (Snippet viewed at Google Books no longer available.)
[20] Wolborough, Devon baptism register covering 1813, entry for baptism of Rowland Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast.
[21] Wolborough, Devon baptism register covering 1814, entry for baptism of Caroline Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast.
[22] Wolborough, Devon baptism register covering 1816, entry for baptism of Charlotte Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast.
[23] Wolborough, Devon baptism register covering 1818, entry for baptism of Charlotte Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast.
[24] Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post, issue 2454, 17 Sep 1812. Transcript available at Genuki.
[25] Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post, issue 256029, Sep 1814. Transcript available at Genuki.
[26] Trewman’s Exeter Flying Post, issue 2693, Thursday 24 Apr 1817.
[27] Pigot & Co. National Commercial Directory (1830). Page 211.
[28] Re: Atcherley, at Manx Genealogy Archive (website, accessed 20 Jul 2014).
[29] FamilySearch shows burial of Rowland Stoherly, age 57, on 26 Aug 1831 at Malew, Isle of Man. Digital folder 004496872, Image 00338.


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The Misses Atcherley and their seaside holidays

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Census records provide us with decennial snapshots of the lives of Atcherley sisters Anne, Hannah and Margaret from 1841 up to the end of the 1800s. These and other records tell us that by 1851 the sisters had moved from their native parish of Baschurch to College Hill in Shrewsbury, and that they remained there, unmarried and living comfortably on money from land and investments, for the rest of their lives. But what did they do in between the censuses? Well, for one thing they went on holidays at the seaside!

In Shropshire Arms and Lineages, published 1869, Frederick Kittermaster described the subjects of this story as follows:

Atcherley, The Misses, of College Hill Court, Shrewsbury, daugs. of the late John Atcherley, of Stanwardine, who died 1847, and who was representative of the family, and descended from Thomas Acheley or Atcherley, of Stanwardine, temp. Hen. VII., the father of Sir Roger Atcherley, Lord Mayor of London 10 Hen. VIII.

Anne, Hannah and Margaret Atcherley (baptised 14 November 1799, 11 Jun 1801 and 7 Apr 1817 respectively, at Baschurch All Saints) were three of ten children born to John Atcherley and his wife Anne Parton at Stanwardine in the Fields. Five of their siblings (four girls and one boy) had died in infancy or early childhood (see MIs at Baschurch All Saints (3)). Their two surviving sisters, Sarah and Martha, had both married by 1841 and the census for that year recorded the three spinsters with their parents, who by that time had moved from Stanwardine to nearby Weston Lullingfields.

Between then and 1851 the sisters had relocated to the county town of Shrewsbury. My guess is that this happened after the death of their father John; I am less certain as to whether the move took place before or after the death of their mother Anne in 1849. Anne, Hannah and Margaret had, along with their married sisters no doubt, each received a generous inheritance from their farming father – including, it would appear, shares of the rents and profits from his land. The 1851 census shows the trio as landed proprietresses. In later years they were recorded as fund holders or annuitants, or living on “income derived from property”.

The money derived from land (and other investments) by ‘The Misses Atcherley’ (as they were referred to not just by Frederick Kittermaster but also by the compilers of directories covering Shropshire such as the 1863 Post Office Directory and the 1870 Kelly’s Directory) paid for their home in Shrewsbury and for the services of one or two servants (from censuses it appears that a cook and a housemaid usually formed part of this Atcherley household). It also funded trips further afield.

We will probably never know the full extent of the Misses Atcherley’s sojourns away from Shrewsbury. Thanks to the visitors lists printed in the newspapers of certain seaside towns however, we know about a couple of their holiday destinations. One was Aberystwyth, on the Cardiganshire coast of Wales. Back in 1815 there were just two horse-drawn coaches a week running between Aberystwyth and Shrewsbury (a journey of around 75 miles) during the summer and one in winter. By 1826, thanks to improved roads and the town’s increasing popularity as a coastal resort, coaches were making the journey in one direction of the other on most days of the week during the summer season. The author of a guide to Aberystwyth wrote “It bids fair to rival the first of the English Marine Bathing Towns.” Elsewhere in the book he explained why:

It is impossible on entering Aberystwyth, to catch the first glimpse of it, unaccompanied with the most vivid sensations of wonder and delight. It lies embosomed between its fostering hills, in a sweet valley, threaded by the Rheidol, close to the margin of the sea. Unlike the tame and monotonous scenery that characterizes many Watering Places, Beauty and Variety seem the twin Goddesses of the place; or, if a third be admitted, the presiding Deity of the bracing breeze, bright-eyed Health, completes the trio.” …

“In addition to the convenience and excellence of the bathing, the salubrious air, and surpassing beauty of the country, Aberystwyth possesses, like Scarborough and Brighton, an advantage over many places on the coast, that of a fine chalybeate spring in its immediate vicinity, the use of which is applicable to, and will much assist in, the cure of many diseases for which the sea is visited.

The first visit made to Aberystwyth by the Atcherley sisters (or at least, the first one I am aware of) took place in 1859. They would have travelled at least part of the way there (if not the whole way) by way of a good old-fashioned horse-drawn coach. The railways had extended into Shrewsbury from various directions from the end of the 1840s (starting with a connection to Chester in 1848), killing off most of the coaching services along those routes in the process. However in 1859 it was not possible to travel all the way from Shrewsbury to Aberystwyth by train (and this remained the case until 1864).

The list of visitors to the town published in the Aberystwyth Observer of 16 July 1859 included the following (I have combined two parts of the list in a single image):

The Misses Atcherley of Shrewsbury were staying at Brynmor House, along with a number of other guests – some of whom were known to them. Mr. J. A. Jebb of Leominster was John Atcherley Jebb, a nephew of the sisters, the oldest son of Martha Jebb nee Atcherley. Aged 22, John was manager of the Leominster and Kington Railway at that time  and the following year he would be appointed traffic manager of the Bahia and San Francisco Railway in Brazil! Miss Jebb of “Prescott Villa” may have been one of John’s older sisters, then resident at Prescott in Baschurch parish. And Miss Jane Emily Barnett of Wikey House (or Wykey House, in the Shropshire parish of Ruyton-XI-Towns) was in fact 21 year old Jane Emily Basnett, who was a second cousin once removed of the Atcherley sisters, and also a third cousin once removed. She had been educated at a ladies boarding school situated almost next door to the Atcherley sisters in College Hill, Shrewsbury and must have known them well. How wonderful to find that the Atcherley sisters were maintaining such close links with their young cousins!

Six years later, the North Wales Chronicle of 30 September 1865 recorded the “Misses Alcherleys” of Shrewsbury staying at Bay’s Hill House in Clonmel Street, Llandudno. Then in August and September 1874 the Misses Atcherley – and maid – of College Hill Court, Shrewsbury were back at Aberystwyth for two to three weeks. The view of The Terrace below dates from the 1890s, but is probably not dissimilar to that which Anne, Hannah and Margaret would have enjoyed. Both of these trips would have been made by train. At the time of their Aberystwyth holiday of 1874, Anne and Hannah were both in their 70s and Margaret was aged 57. All three still had a few years left in them, and I hope they managed to share a few more holidays during those years.

The 1881 census would be the last to feature the three Misses Atcherley, as Hannah died in 1885. It is from the years after this event that I have found evidence of some of her sister Margaret’s other interests. On 10 October 1889, Miss M. Atcherley of Shrewsbury was admitted to membership of the Evangelical Alliance, having most likely put her name forward at a meeting of that society held at Shrewsbury on 30 September. At that meeting, Mr. Arnold gave “an account of the Alliance and its work in various departments—the fostering of the spirit of brotherly love and union, the great and world-wide results of united prayer as seen in the observance of the Week of Prayer, and the blessing which God had given to the efforts of the Alliance on behalf of those who were deprived of their religious liberty.” Then, in 1892 or ’93, “a testimonial to Miss M. Atcherley, late Secretary to the Ladies Association, Shrewsbury” amounting to £9 8s. 6d. was given by her to the Church Missionary Society to support the work of its Children’s Home.

At the time of the 1891 census the home of the two surviving Atcherley sisters was being shared with their widowed sister Martha Jebb, and their niece Ellen Jebb. Each of the Atcherley sisters was “living on her own means”. The extent of the Misses Atcherleys’ ‘own means’ is revealed by records resulting from their deaths: entries in the ‘National Probate Calendars’. Hannah passed away on 18 May 1885, leaving will; administration of her estate was granted to Anne and Margaret. Her personal estate was valued at £3,539 6s. 4d. Anne was the next to ‘depart this life’, on 1 August 1892. Again there was no will. Administration was granted to Margaret, with Anne’s effects totalling £6140 13s. 3d. (There was a further grant of probate, to John Atcherley Jebb, in 1898 when effects of £456 were recorded.) Unlike her sisters, Margaret Atcherley did make a will. She appointed John Atcherley Jebb and another nephew, John’s brother George Robert Jebb, as executors. Margaret died on 14 April 1898 at College Hill, her home of nearly 50 years, leaving effects of £9359 13s. 6d.

The estates of both Anne and Margaret Atcherley included shares. Records show that Anne’s Consolidated Ordinary Stock was passed on to Margaret, whose own Consolidated Ordinary and 4¼% Debenture Stocks went to her aforementioned nephews. The stocks they had purchased were quite appropriate given the sisters’ fondness for travel, for the business in which they had invested was the Great Western Railway Company.


Picture credits. Stagecoach: from Aberystwyth Observer of 11 Feb 1860, at Welsh Newspapers Online; copyright status unknown but believed to be public domain. List of visitors: composite image from sections of Aberystwyth Observer, 16 July 1859, page 2, at Welsh Newspapers Online; copyright status unknown but believed to be public domain. The terrace, Aberystwyth, Wales: from the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, reproduction number LC-DIG-ppmsc-07349; no known restrictions on reproduction.


References

[1] 1841 census of England and Wales. Piece 918, book 1, folio 38, page 5. Weston Lulligfields.
[2] 1851 census of England and Wales. Piece 1992, folio 477, page 28. Shrewsbury.
[3] 1861 census of England and Wales. Piece 1873, folio 16, page 26. Shrewsbury.
[4] 1871 census of England and Wales. Piece 2776, folio 7, page 6. Shrewsbury.
[5] 1881 census of England and Wales. Piece 2653, folio 19, page 31. Shrewsbury.
[6] 1891 census of England and Wales. Piece 2112, folio 13, page 20. Shrewsbury.
[7] Frederick W Kittermaster, (1869), Shropshire Arms and Lineages, compiled from The Herald’s Visitations and Ancient MSS. Appendix, page ii. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[8] Baschurch, Shropshire parish register covering 1799, entry for baptism of Anne Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch C03390-1, Film 510651.
[9] Baschurch, Shropshire parish register covering 1801, entry for baptism of Hannah Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch C03390-1, Film 510651.
[10] Baschurch, Shropshire baptism register covering 1817, entry for baptism of Margaret Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch C03390-1, Film 510651.
[11] Monumental inscriptions at Baschurch All Saints, Shropshire. See photos and transcriptions at MIs at Baschurch All Saints (1) and MIs at Baschurch All Saints (3).
[12] On this day: 21 March 1798 at Atcherley.org.uk.
[13] Baschurch, Shropshire marriage register covering 1831, entry for John Jebb and Martha Atcherley. Copies viewed at Shropshire Archives and Findmypast.
[14] The Post Office Directory of Gloucestershire, Herefordshire, Shropshire, and the City of Bristol. Page 747. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[15] E R Kelly (ed.) (1870), The Post Office Directory of Shropshire, Staffordshire, and Worcestershire. Page 135. For abstract see Directories Part 2.
[16] Thomas Rees (1815), The Beauties of England and Wales. Volume XVIII: South Wales. Page 415. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[17] Thomas Jeffery Llewelyn Prichard (1824), The new Aberystwyth guide. Pages 1 – 458, and 192-3. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[18] Constance Everson (1984), Downward Journey: Stage Coaching in Shrewsbury 1833-1861. In: Barrie Trinder (ed.) (1984), Victorian Shrewsbury. Page 88.
[19] Aberystwyth Observer, 16 July 1859, page 2. Copy viewed at Welsh Newspapers Online.
[20] Western Mail (Cardiff), issue 7638, 10 Nov 1893. Article: The Mayors of South Wales, Portraits and biographies.
[21] 1851 census of England and Wales. Piece 1992, folio 475, pages 24 and 25. Head: Mary Elizth Arrowsmith, unmarried, 53, governess of ladies boarding school, born Leominster, Herefordshire. Pupil: Jane Emily Basnett, 11, born Shry [= Shrewsbury, in error for Ruyton-XI-Towns]. Plus 4 teachers, 4 servants (cook & housekeeper, housemaid, 2 house servants) and 18 more pupils (girls aged 8 to 17).
[22] North Wales Chronicle, 30 Sep 1865, page 12.
[23] Aberystwyth Observer, 22 Aug 1874, page 4; 29 Aug 1874, page 4 and 5 Sep 1874, page 4.
[24] Evangelical Christendom. Volume 43. Nov 1889. Pages 348-9. Copy viewed at Google Books (via proxy server).
[25] Church Missionary Society (1893), Proceedings of the Church Missionary Society for the year 1892-93. Pages 275-7. Copy viewed at Google Books (via proxy server).
[26] Principal Probate Registry: Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration (1885). Copy viewed at Ancestry – England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966.
[27] Principal Probate Registry: Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration (1892). Copy viewed at Ancestry – England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966.
[28] Principal Probate Registry: Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration (1898). Copy viewed at Ancestry – England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966.
[29] The Great Western Railway Shareholders Index (Volume 57 Folio 70 Entry 271). Copy viewed at Findmypast. Original document held by Society of Genealogists.
[30] The Great Western Railway Shareholders Index (Volume 75 Folio 7 Entry 29). Copy viewed at Findmypast. Original document held by Society of Genealogists.


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