The Rev James Atcherley, Head Master of Shrewsbury – Part 1

I Roger Atcherly of Frankwell within the Liberties of Shrewsbury Tanner (in health of body and of sound mind) do make this my Will … to my Son James Atcherly for as much it hath cost me as much money in Education in bringing him to the ministry therefore I do give to him five pounds to be paid to him one whole year after my decease … — Will of Roger Atcherley, 17 September 1755

James Atcherley’s education began in earnest some 16 years before his father’s last will and testament was made, at Shrewsbury’s Royal Free Grammar School. Shrewsbury School was “a cherished institution in which Town and County alike took pride”, where “Most of the leading citizens of Shrewsbury and many of the gentry of Shropshire and the adjoining counties of England and Wales had been educated”. Having been baptised at Shrewsbury St Chad on 18 November 1730, James must have been 8 or maybe 9 years old when he entered the Third School in 1739.

Some ten years later, on 15 March 1748-9, 18-year-old James Atcherley was admitted to Cambridge University’s Magdalene College (the college’s chapel is shown right). In 1753 the university granted James his B.A., and the title of ‘Wrangler’ – a student who had gained first-class honours in the third year of the University’s undergraduate degree in mathematics. An indication that James retained an interest in maths and related fields is the fact that he was a subscriber to Edward Wareing’s 1762 publication Miscellanea analytica de aequationibus algebraicis, et curvarum proprietatibus, and to Dr Robert Smith’s 1778 work Compleat System of Opticks, selected and arranged for the use of students at the universities. James obtained his M.A. from Magdalene in 1763.

As James’s education had been paid for by his father to “[bring] him to the ministry”, a church career beckoned once James had secured his B.A. He was ordained as Deacon on 23 June 1753 and was appointed Curate of Smethcott in Shropshire on 24 September that year. His curacy there may have been only temporary however. Certainly, the marriage register shows that weddings in the parish from 1754 to 1774 were carried out exclusively by David Rice, Rector of Smethcott, who also signed the main parish register below the entries made for 1753 and 1754.

In 1755 a second field of employment opened up for James. I wonder what thoughts went through the mind of this former pupil of the Third School at Shrewsbury when, on 25 November that year, he returned as its Master? He was appointed to this post by the Mayor of Shrewsbury, Edward Blakeway Esquire, and the ‘chief schoolmaster’, the Rev Charles Newling.

Shrewsbury School – the upper school room

The clerical career of James Atcherley continued alongside his duties at Shrewsbury School. He became Curate of Montford, conducting his first marriage ceremony there on 12 May 1756, and five of the next eight weddings at that church up to 26 June 1758. James also began officiating from time to time at marriages which took place closer to home and at a much busier church, that of Shrewsbury St Mary. His first marriage there, on 3 August 1756, was followed by seven others, in 1758, 1762, 1767, 1775, 1779 (two in that year) and 1781. He was one of a number of Ministers who occasionally ‘filled in’ for the incumbents during that period.

Within the parish of Shrewsbury St Mary – the boundaries of which extended well beyond the town – lay the chapelry of Astley. Its register includes the following entry, dated 22 October 1761:

The Rev’d Mr. Samuel Betton dyed & James Atcherley succeeded him in this Curacy of Astley, being nominated thereunto by Henry Adams Esq. Mayor of Shrewsbury & The Revd. Mr Charles Newling chief Schoolmaster.

It is unlikely that the Curacy of Astley took up a great deal of James’s time. From the introduction of the new marriage registers in 1754 up to the end of 1812 there were but ten marriages held at the chapel. James Atcherley conducted only one of these, on 23 May 1763. The Perpetual Curacy of Grinshill, to which James was also appointed in 1761, was a little busier. After he officiated at two marriages at Grinshill on 23 February 1762, James conducted 16 of the next 24 weddings to take place at the church, the last one on 28 February 1797.

Why have I have concentrated on James Atcherley’s role of performing marriages at the churches and chapels where he was Curate? Simply because it was those ceremonies which, from 1754, required the officiating minister to sign the records made in connection with them, in the marriage register. Entries in the main parish register for baptisms and burials were not signed. As Curate, James would I am sure have conducted these ceremonies, in addition to church services at which he would have preached to his parishioners, led them in singing hymns, and taken collections.

There was another, less well-known aspect of James Atcherley’s life as a ‘man of the cloth’. James was one of many ‘visiting clergymen’ who attended the Salop Infirmary. The number of weeks in the period from 1756 and 1791 in which he “Visited the Infirmary in rotation” was 104, a total which, as of 1847, had been exceeded by only eight others.

In 1762, James Atcherley was made a burgess of the town of Shrewsbury. There were four ways in which a person could gain admission as a burgess – James would have qualified by virtue of the fact that he was born in the town. As for the four rights and privileges accorded to burgesses, the rights to trade in the town, and of pasturage in the Quarry and at Kingsland, were of little value to our reverend schoolmaster. However, James certainly made use of his right to vote in Borough elections. In addition – as we will shortly see – he also took advantage of the burgess’s privilege of “Free education for his sons at the Royal Free Grammar Schools”.

The marriage of “The Reverd. Mr. James Atcherley of the Parish of Saint Mary and Miss Eleanor Griffiths of this Parish” took place at Shrewsbury St Chad on 15 December 1766. The couple were wed by the Rev Charles Newling – then Head Master of Shrewsbury School. Eleanor’s siblings Richard and Catherine Griffiths signed the marriage register as witnesses.

A marriage notice in the London Public Advertiser stated that Eleanor was “Daughter of the late John Griffiths, Esq; of Bicton near Shrewsbury” (she was baptised at St Chad on 11 February 1736/7). Tracing her ancestors back a few more generations reveals that she had Atcherley forebears too: her great grandparents were Shrewsbury alderman Roger Griffiths and his wife Mary – nee Atcherley – of Marton.

The London Public Advertiser also noted that James Atcherley was “second Master of the Free Grammar School” in Shrewsbury. He had been “admitted into the second school” (appointed Second Master) following the death of the previous holder of that position, the Rev John Brooke, on 29 Nov 1763. Four years after James’s marriage to Eleanor, on Christmas Day 1770, Head Master Rev Charles Newling resigned from his post. James Atcherley was then admitted to Shrewsbury School’s top job by the town’s Mayor, William Smith Esquire.

Shrewsbury School – from The Shropshire Gazetteer, 1824

Everything seemed to be going well for the Rev James Atcherley. By the time of his appointment to the position of Head Master, his wife Eleanor had delivered two children, Roger and Eleanor, who were baptised at Shrewsbury St Mary on 23 February 1768 and 12 May 1769 respectively. Six more children followed. John, Arabella and Dorothy were baptised at St Mary on 1 April 1771, 18 June 1771, and 29 July 1774. (The short interval between the dates for John and Arabella’s ceremonies suggest that John’s was held quite some time after his birth.) Sadly, Dorothy died within a year of her birth, and was buried at St Mary on 17 May 1775.

James and Eleanor’s sixth child, James junior (see An Atcherley at Trafalgar), was probably born in the year in which their daughter Dorothy died. However I have found no evidence to show that James was ever baptised. Nor have I found any trace of baptisms for Mary Atcherley, born around 1781, or Ann Atcherley, born about 1787, the last two children born to the Rev James Atcherley and Eleanor.

Why would a clergyman, of all people, fail to have three of his own children baptised? It is of course possible that these three were sickly children at birth, who were privately baptised (perhaps by James himself) at home. But such private baptisms were usually followed by ceremonies at which the children in question were ‘publicly received’ into the church. There is no evidence that this happened in the case of James, Mary or Ann. I can’t help but wonder whether the death of his daughter Dorothy had affected the Rev James Atcherley rather profoundly.

James’s apparent failure to baptise his last three children is not the only puzzle about this part of his life. History has not painted a particularly flattering picture of James Atcherley’s tenure as Head Master of Shrewsbury School – allegations of intemperance and lack of discipline on James’s part are on record. Furthermore, the register of admissions to the school dating from 1664, which had been handed over to James by his predecessor Charles Newling, was lost while James was in charge. Among the many scholars whose names were recorded in that precious volume was at least one of James Atcherley’s own sons.

> On to Part 2.


Picture credits. Magdalene College Chapel: Photo by David Iliff, taken from Wikimedia Commons, adapted, used and made available re-use under a Creative Commons licence. Shrewsbury School – the upper school room: image from page 93 of A History of Shrewsbury School (at Internet Archive), published 1889 and therefore out of copyright. Shrewsbury School: Image from The Shropshire Gazetteer, published 1824 and therefore out of copyright.


References.

[1] Will of Roger Atcherley of Shrewsbury, tanner. Proved 22 Oct 1756. Typed transcript viewed at Society of Genealogists, London. Electronic transcript supplied by Barbara Lang. Indexed at Staffordshire Name Indexes.
[2]
W E Heitland (1896), Dr Butler of Shrewsbury School. In: The Eagle, volume XIX, pages 417-8. Originally viewed in full at Google Books, but now snippet view only.
[3] J E Auden (1909), Shrewsbury School Register 1734-1908. Pages 6 and 12. Copy viewed at Internet Archive.
[4] St Chad, Shrewsbury, parish register covering 1730. Entry for baptism of “James S. of Rog Atcherley”. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1916), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, Volume XVI, St. Chad’s, Shrewsbury (volume II, page 960); copies viewed at Internet Archive and Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P01575-2, Film 908236.
[5] John Venn, J A Venn (1922), Alumni Cantabrigienses. Part I, volume I, page 51. Copy viewed at Internet Archive.
[6] Edward Kelly Purnell (1904), Magdalene College. Page 166. Copy viewed at Internet Archive and Mocavo.
[7] Wrangler (University of Cambridge). At: Wikipedia (website, accessed 28 Jun 2015).
[8] Edward Waring (1762), Miscellanea analytica de aequationibus algebraicis, et curvarum proprietatibus. Page v (A list of the Subscribers). Copy viewed at Internet Archive.
[9] Robert Smith (1778), Compleat System of Opticks, selected and arranged for the use of students at the universities. Page vii (Subscribers). Copy viewed at Google Books.
[10] Atcherley, James (1753 – 1804). At: Clergy of the Church of England database (website, accessed 29 Jun 2015).
[11] Smethcott, Shropshire, marriage register for 1754 to 1811. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Parish Register Browse.
[12] Smethcott, Shropshire, parish register for 1747 to 1812. Page 5. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Parish Register Browse.
[13] Thomas Phillips, Charles Hulbert (1837), The history and antiquities of Shrewsbury. Pages 130-1. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[14] Montford, Shropshire, marriage register for 1755 to 1812. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Parish Register Browse. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1909), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume VII. Montford, page 127. Copy viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and Mel Lockie’s website.
[15] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, marriage register covering the years 1756 to 1781. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, pages 648 to 683, copy viewed at Mel Lockie’s website.
[16] John Brickdale Blakeway and W G Dimmock Fletcher (ed.) (1890), History of Shrewsbury Hundred or Liberties. In: Transactions of the Shropshire Archaeological and Natural History Society. 2nd series, volume II (1890), part I. Page 353. Originally viewed in full at Google Books, but now snippet view only.
[17] Grinshill, Shropshire, marriage register for 1757 to 1811. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Parish Registers Browse.
[18] Henry Bevan (1847), Records of the Salop Infirmary, from the Commencement of the Charity to the Present Time, Being a Period of One Hundred Years. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[19] Herbert Edward Forrest (ed.) (1924), Shrewsbury Burgess Roll. Page 9. Copy viewed and photographed at Shropshire Archives.
[20] Anon (1796), The Poll for the Borough of Shrewsbury 1796. Copy viewed at Ancestry – UK, Poll Books and Electoral Registers, 1538-1893.
[21] St Chad, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, marriage register covering 1766. Entry for James Atcherley and Eleanor Griffiths. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Marriages (James indexed as James Archerley). Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1918), Diocese of Lichfield, volume XVII, St Chad’s, Shrewsbury (volume III), copy viewed at Shropshire Archives.
[22] Public Advertiser (London, England), issue 100031, 25 Dec 1766, page 4. Copy viewed at 17th-18th Century Burney Collection Newspapers.
[23] St Chad, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1766. Entry for James Atcherley and Eleanor Griffiths. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire
[24] Joseph Morris (1906), The Provosts and Bailiffs of Shrewsbury. In: Transactions of the Shropshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, 3rd series, volume VI, page 193. Copy viewed at Internet Archive.
[25] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1768. Entry for baptism of Roger Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 438; copies viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00681-1, Film 908234.
[26] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1769. Entry for baptism of Eleanor Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 442; copies viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00681-1, Film 908234.
[27] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1771. Entry for baptism of John Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 448; copies viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00681-1, Film 908234.
[28] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1771. Entry for baptism of Arabella Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 448; copies viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00681-1, Film 908234.
[29] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1774. Entry for baptism of Dorothy Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 458; copies viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00681-1, Film 908234.
[30] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1775. Entry for burial of Dorothy Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Burials. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 461; copies viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website.
[31] George William Fisher, John Spencer Hill (1899), Annals of Shrewsbury School. Page 252 et seq.

Revising the roots of the family tree

For me, one of the benefits of writing up the Atcherley family history is that it makes me review – and sometimes revise – the work I have already done. In pulling together a story, I look again at the information I have (and often go looking for more), verify the sources of my data, and check to see that the conclusions I have drawn stand up to scrutiny. Often I make some new discoveries that corroborate my conclusions and enhance the story. Sometimes, however, the process highlights evidence which causes me to challenge my assumptions.

I began researching my Atcherley roots back in 2007. Following the standard process, I gradually went back a generation at a time using vital records, census data, parish registers, wills and so on, forming conclusions based on the available evidence. Along the way I also looked at the genealogical work of others, some carried out in recent times and some back to the 1800s. Rather than slavishly copying these researchers’ results, I used their family trees, and the sources within them, as reference material to compare with and support my own work.

Sometimes I have agreed with the relationships shown in those family trees, sometimes I haven’t. After all, a chain of parent-child relationships linked together to show a person’s ancestry does not necessarily represent an unbroken sequence of facts. It is a series of conclusions which have been formed using the evidence to hand. The same evidence can in some cases support different conclusions. And sometimes the evidence available to one genealogist is not available (or simply not found) by another. (See Edge of the tree no longer: Thomas Atcherley, alias Edge for an example of a how single record can change a family tree.)

Ultimately, I traced my mother’s lineage back through Fred, Henry (born out of wedlock), Mary, Samuel, John, John, Samuel, John and finally my 8x great grandfather, another John baptised in 1613, son of Richard Atcherley of Stanwardine in the Fields, Shropshire (see John Atcherley, draper of Shrewsbury). But now I believe that one of the links in that chain is, to say the least, suspect.

My doubts arose this week when I looked at the connections between the Atcherley and Elsmere families back in the 1600s, as a potential story for this website. Roger Atcherley, brother of my 8x great grandfather John, married Elizabeth Elsmere (daughter of Samuel Elsmere and his wife Alice, nee Leigh) in 1645. Then, in 1685, Elizabeth’s niece – another Elizabeth Elsmere (daughter of Samuel Elsmere junior and his wife Katherine, nee Stiles) – married Roger’s nephew (my 7x great grandfather) John Atcherley. Talk about keeping it in the family! But was everything as it appeared?

During my early research into the Atcherley family tree, I found that my 6x great grandfather Samuel Atcherley was baptised on 2 September 1687 at Shrewsbury St Mary in Shropshire and was the second son of John Atcherley of Newton and Elizabeth, nee Elsmere (see Samuel Atcherley’s true and perfect inventory (Part 1)). When I looked for the baptism of Samuel’s father, there was only one candidate to be found: John, the son of John Atcherley (and his wife Judith, nee Kynaston), also at Shrewsbury St Mary, on 11 February 1647/8. However, it turns out that the ‘available evidence’ upon which this conclusion was reached, was somewhat lacking.

The incomplete nature of the genealogical evidence available to us is one of the challenges faced by myself and my fellow Atcherley researchers (past and present). Not all life events were recorded, and of those life events which were committed to paper or parchment, not all of the records have survived. One example of a missing record is that of the baptism of John, son of the aforementioned Roger Atcherley and his wife Elizabeth, nee Elsmere.

Surviving baptismal records show that Roger and Elizabeth had three children.  “Elizabeth the daughter of Roger Acherley of Cotten was baptised the 30th day of May 1647” at Edstaston chapel in the parish of Wem. At the same place, six years later on 19 June 1653, “Roger the Son of Roger Acherley of Cotton” was baptised (the register of Shrewsbury St Mary then records “Rogger the Sonne of Rogger Acherley Buried ye 30th of march” 1657). Finally, in 1655 an entry in Baschurch All Saints’ parish register shows that “Mary the daughter of Roger Atcherley & Elizab. his wife of Stanwardine in the wood was borne the 28 day of June & baptized the 1 day of July”.

Less than seven years after the baptism of his daughter Mary, Roger Atcherley died. He was 46. According to the Baschurch parish register “Roger Atcherley of Stanwardine in the wood was buryed the 27th day of ffebruary” in 1661/2. He made a verbal will “on or aboute the twentith day of ffebruary” as follows:

… Roger Atcherley of Stanwardine in the wood in the County of Salop yeom beinge weake & sicke butt of sound minde & memorie (of which sicknes he dyed) did make and declare his will by word of mouth to the effect followinge, That his Sonne John should have his lands in Edstason & Whitchurch when he came to age And that the rest of his estate Should goe amongst his wief and two daughters accordinge to the Custome of the Countrey and named his wief Elizabeth and his daughter Elizabeth his execes [= executrixes] in the psense of the psons whose names are Subscribed

The mark of Elizabeth Atcherley and the signature of “John Elsmer” followed.

Roger’s son John was most likely born around 1650, between the births of Elizabeth and Roger junior. It is possible that he was born at Coton in the parish of Wem and baptised at Edstaston Chapel, but that the record of his baptism – if one was made – has not survived. The page of the Wem register showing entries for Edstaston around the time in question has baptisms for 1648, followed by an assortment of baptisms for 1653 and 1654 in seemingly random order. This suggests to me that the entries were made long after the baptisms had been carried out, probably from incomplete notes made on scraps of parchment. Any record made of baptisms from 1649 to the early part of 1653 appear to have been lost.

Edstaston St Mary

When I first added John to my Atcherley family tree I noted: “I have not traced any records for John other than his appearance in his father Roger’s will …”. Not only was there no record of his baptism, neither was there one of his burial. Nor was there any indication of an intervening marriage. Unless of course he was the John Atcherley who married Elizabeth Elsmere in 1685, a thought that struck me while reviewing my Atcherleys and Elsmeres over the last few days.

Contrasting the will of Roger Atcherley with that of his twice-married brother John, made in 1672, revealed an interesting fact. John left 5 shillings apiece to “sonnes & daughters by a former wiefe”, who were named as Edward, Richard, Elizabeth and Judith. He made no mention of a son named John, which suggests that he no longer had a son by that name. Furthermore, the Atcherley estate at Stanwardine did not descend to the younger John Atcherley who married Elizabeth Elsmere.

On re-checking the family trees and pedigrees compiled by others I have found that some, including the late Martyn Freeth of Shrewsbury (who was a highly respected genealogist), had arrived at the same conclusions that I originally had. But on looking at the pedigree notes made in the early 1800s by the Rev John Newling (1762 – 1838) (see Atcherleys reunited for more on this source) I now realise that Newling thought otherwise.

Included in one of the Rev Newling’s pedigrees were “John Atcherley of Newton on the Heath” and his wife “Eliz. Elsmere” who were married on 14 May 1685. In pencil, Newling scribbled next to John Atcherley’s details “Revd. J. A. said that he was born at M____” and also indicated that John was the son of “Atcherley of M____”.

“Revd. J. A.” was James Atcherley (1730 – 1804), a grandson of John and Elizabeth. I had thought that the rather unclear place name beginning with ‘M’ was a fanciful claim by James to Marton (the home of another branch of the Atcherley family). But I now realise that the place referred to began with an ‘N’ not an ‘M’ – it was Newton (on the Heath), in the parish of Shrewsbury St Mary. Finally, written by Newling in ink above the details for John and Elizabeth was “Eliza Atcherley of Newton”, buried 6 May 1692 – this, I believe, was Roger Atcherley’s widow Elizabeth.

Taking all of this into account it is now my belief that it was Roger Atcherley (born at Stanwardine in the Fields but later of Coton, Stanwardine in the Wood and Newton on the Heath) and his wife Elizabeth Elsmere who were my 8x great grandparents. My 7x great grandparents, John Atcherley and Elizabeth Elsmere, were ‘kissing cousins’ – first cousins to be precise. Which means that I am not descended from John Atcherley of Stanwardine and Shrewsbury, nor from his wife Judith Kynaston with her royal connections.

Having revised the roots of my family tree I now have some work to do. My online and offline Atcherley trees need amending, and a number of stories on this website must be updated!


Picture credits. Tree roots: Photo by the author. Links between the Atcherley and Elsmere families: Diagram by the author. Edstaston St Mary: Photo © copyright Michael Patterson, taken from Geograph, adapted, used, and made available for re-use under a Creative Commons licence. Links between the Atcherley and Elsmere families: Diagram by the author.


References.

[1] Baschurch, Shropshire, parish register. Entry dated 22 Sep 1615 for baptism of “Roger the sonne of Richarde Atcherley”. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Transcript viewed at Shropshire Archives. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch C03390-1, Film 510651.
[2] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register. Entry dated 4 Apr 1645 for marriage of “Roger Atcherley & Elizabeth Elsmoore”. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Marriages. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 104; copies viewed at Internet ArchiveMocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website.
[3] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register. Entry dated 19 Feb 1617/8 for “Elizabeth daughter off Sam Elsmere”. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00681-1, Film 908234.
[4] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register. Entry dated 2 Feb 1615/6 for marriage “Samuell Ellsmere and Ales Leighe”. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Marriages.
[5] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register. Entry dated 25 Jan 1656/7 for baptism of “Elizabeth the daughter of Samuell Ellsmere”. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00681-1, Film 908234.
[6] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register. Entry dated 22 Apr 1647 for marriage of Samuell Elsmore and Katherin Stiles. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 104; copy viewed at Mocavo.
[7] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register. Entry dated 8 Dec 1621 for baptism of Samuell Ellsmere. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 61; copy viewed at Mocavo.
[8] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register. Entry dated 14 May 1685 for marriage of “John Atcherley & Elizabeth Elismere”. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Marriages. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 179; copies viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website.
[9] Shrewsbury St Mary, Shropshire, parish register covering 1687. Entry for baptism of Samuel Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 186 viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00681-1. Film 908234.
[10] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1647/8. Entry for baptism of John Atcherley. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 107; copies viewed at Internet Archive,Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00681-1. Film 908234.
[11] Wem, Shropshire, parish register (entries for Edstaston) covering 1647. Entry for baptism of Elizabeth Acherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1908), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume IX, Wem (volume I, page 170); copies viewed at Mocavo and Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00897-1, Film 908233.
[12] Wem, Shropshire, parish register (entries for Edstaston) covering 1653. Entry for baptism of Roger Acherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1908), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume IX, Wem (volume I, page 171); copies viewed at Mocavo and Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P00897-1, Film 908233.
[13] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1657. Entry for burial of Rogger Acherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Burials. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 120; copies viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website.
[14] Baschurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1655. Entry for baptism of Mary Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Transcript viewed at Shropshire Archives. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch C03390-1, Film 510651.
[15] Baschurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1661/2. Entry for burial of Roger Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Burials. Transcript viewed at Shropshire Archives.
[16] Will of Roger Atcherley of Baschurch, yeoman. Proved 30 Apr 1662. Copy from Lichfield Record Office, reference B/C/11. Indexed at Staffordshire Name Indexes.
[17] Wem, Shropshire, parish register for 1583 – 1647. Page 316 (Edstaston). Copy viewed at Findmypast – Parish Register Browse (page 318 of 321).
[18] Will of John Atcherley of Baschurch, gentleman. Proved 15 Oct 1672. Typed transcript viewed at Society of Genealogists, London. Electronic transcript supplied by Barbara Lang. Indexed at Staffordshire Name Indexes.
[19] Martyn Freeth (2010), The Family of Atcherley of Stanwardine and Marton. Unpublished Word document.
[20] Staffordshire Record Office item S. MS.269/1/14, undated, Pedigrees of families in Shropshire (etc) from the collection of the Revd. John Newling: Atcherley, co. Salop. Indexed at Gateway to the Past.
[21] St Mary, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1692. Entry for burial of “Elizabeth Atcherley of Newton”. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1911), Shropshire Parish Registers, Diocese of Lichfield, volume XII, page 202; copies viewed at Internet Archive, Mocavo and at Mel Lockie’s website.

Doctor Atcherley’s Casebook – Part 1

There were two members of the Atcherley family named John who became doctors. The best known of the two was the Dr John Atcherley who was born in Lancashire and went to live in Hawaii. The other was born in Shropshire and went to live in …. Lancashire! I can’t give this Dr Atcherley his own TV show like the fictional Dr Finlay. But through this website I can at least bring his story to a limited online audience, and share details of some of the medical cases he was involved with.

John Atcherley was the third of three children (all boys) born to the Rev Roger Atcherley and his wife Mary (nee Rennell), who lived in Bridgnorth, Shropshire. According to their Family New Testament and Prayer Book, John was born at half past four in the afternoon on 18 June 1804, and was baptised on 1 July that year. I have found no record of this ceremony in any parish register however, so it may have been a private baptism at home. Another baptism took place five and a half years later on 12 Jan 1810, in nearby Tasley (church pictured above), and was performed by the Rev Joseph Morris.

There was a John Atcherley who entered Shrewsbury School in 1821 and left in 1823. Was he this John? It is tempting to think that he was, as one of the school’s former headmasters was John’s grandfather, the Rev James Atcherley. However there were several other boys around at the time who shared John’s name. The identity of this Salopian scholar remains unconfirmed.

On 3 January 1833 John married Mary Morris at the church of St Leonard in Bridgnorth. Mary was the daughter of Rev Joseph Morris, who had baptised John back in 1810. Although newspapers at the time referred to him as “the late Rev. Joseph Morris,” the Rector of Tasley was still very much alive. He did in fact pass away four years later in 1837.

The marriage register of Bridgnorth St Leonard shows that at the time of his wedding to Mary, John was residing in Liverpool. John returned to that city with his new wife, and it was there that the couple had two children. Eleanor Vickers Atcherley, evidently named for her grandaunt Eleanor Vickers (nee Atcherley), was baptised at the church of St Peter on 30 December 1833. Eleanor never married, and it appears that she shared her parents’ home until the death of her father. John Atcherley junior was also baptised at St Peter’s, on 9 August 1839, but he died at the age of 7 months and was buried at St Michael’s on 4 February 1839.

John Atcherley was, to begin with, an apothecary, or a chemist and druggist. Some of the earlier medical directories in which he appeared credited him with the qualification “L.S.A. Dub.” (as in the above entry in the British Medical Directory of 1853) or “L.S.A. Dublin” – Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries, Dublin.

As Bird and Atcherley of “Gt. George’s pl” in Liverpool, John Atcherley and Richard Bird were listed as “Chymists & druggists” in Pigot & Co’s Directory of 1834. The two men did not restrict themselves to selling and administering medicinal drugs in the normal way however. During December 1833 and January 1834, they had the following advertisement printed in the Liverpool Mercury:

BATHS.
BIRD and ATCHERLEY,
CHEMISTS, GREAT GEORGE-PLACE,

BEING long aware of the necessity of BATHS in the southern part of the town, have just erected in a complete manner, and on improved principles, VAPOUR and MEDICATED BATHS, HOT and COLD PLUNGE BATHS, with SHOWER BATHS, regulated to any temperature. Should they be honoured by public patronage, every attention which personal superintendence can bestow, together with the suggestion of the Medical Profession, may be strictly relied on; as the application of any remedial agent, in the form of vapour, can be safely and effectually introduced.

AN APPRENTICE WANTED.

In December 1836, the partnership between Richard Bird and John Atcherley was dissolved by mutual consent. When the 1841 census was taken four and a half years later John, although still residing at Great George Place in Liverpool, was no longer a chemist and druggist. He was by this time a surgeon, having become a Licentiate of the Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons at Glasgow in 1840.

On the strength of his qualification from Glasgow, John was admitted an ad eundem(or honorary) Member of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1855 (the arms of the College are shown right). It seems likely that by this time John and his family were no longer residents of 3 Great George Place, as the lease of that property was advertised as being for sale on 1 December 1851.

The Atcherleys may initially have moved to 75 Great George Place, an address which the Royal College of Surgeons gave for John in their Medical Registers of 1859 and 1863. John was also listed at this address in the 1860Gore’s Directory covering Liverpool. However at the time of the census of 1861 the Atcherley family was at 22 St James Road, Mount Pleasant in Liverpool. They were still there in 1870 when John’s wife Mary Atcherley died (on 3 April), but by the following year John and his daughter Eleanor had relocated to 32 Windsor Street in Toxteth Park. They remained there for next two decades.

Although John Atcherley transitioned from apothecary to surgeon, he retained a strong interest in the chemical sciences and indeed in science generally. In 1838 he was listed as a member of the British Association for the Advancement of Science, and in 1867 he joined the Anthropological Society of London. (It appears that he was also a Mason, belonging to Lodge No. 368, Lodge of Sincerity, at Liverpool.) On 24 February 1852, the Liverpool Mercury reported as follows on a lecture given by John, which was attended by his wife and daughter:

Lecture on Chemistry.—In St. Barnabas’s school, Greenland-street, on Wednesday evening last, John Atcherley, Esq., surgeon, of Great George-place, gave the second of a course of lectures illustrative of the chemistry of atmospheric air and water. These lectures were originally designed for the instruction of the senior pupils attending the school; but upon this occasion the urgent and reiterated requests of many members of the congregation and supporters of the school to be present were such as to induce Mr. Atcherley, in his usual spirit of philanthropy, to admit all.

It is impossible to speak too highly of the manner in which the lecturer treated the subject, both as regards the intelligibility of the language used, the definitions given of technicalities, and the numerous and truly-interesting experiments adopted as illustrations, which, combined, cannot fail to make a lasting impression on the minds of his audience, which was numerous and highly respectable.

From the earliest years of his career as a surgeon there was coverage of the medical cases in which Dr John Atcherley was involved, in the press and in medical journals. The earliest examples which I have found so far date back to 1841. A newspaper article from that year, reporting on Coroner’s Inquests held in November, highlighted the dangers of the demon drink:

The second inquest was on view of the body of James Wells, aged 50, a provision dealer, who resided in Upper Frederick-street. He had been complaining of illness for about a month past, and was found dead in his bed on Saturday morning last. Mr. Atcherley, surgeon, examined the body, and found violent inflammation of the stomach, combined with ulceration. The small intestines were also inflamed. The vessels of the brain were very much congested, and the heart much enlarged. It was his opinion that excessive drinking must have hastened the death of the deceased. Verdict accordingly.

The drink-related death of James Wells was far from an isolated incident. John Skillicorn, a master painter of Park Lane whose inquest was held in May 1852, was “another case arising from drunkenness.” He had gone to “Mr. Bird’s baths” – probably the same baths that Richard Bird had run with John Atcherley in the 1830s – “in a state of intoxication as he had often done before.” He was found “in a state of insensibility” and although John Atcherley was called in, Skillicorn died from apoplexy.

I am aware of another three of John Atcherley’s cases where alcohol sent men to the afterlife. In 1856 John Corliss, who was “addicted to drinking”, had “a three days’ ‘spree.’” Despite the care he received from Dr Atcherley after this, his condition worsened and he died at around 1:00 am on Friday 13 June. Then, in December 1862, ship’s carpenter David Marshall, aged 40, returned home from a voyage to the Baltic. He was “in a state of drunkenness” for a whole week until Saturday 4 January, and was found dead in his bed on Sunday 5th. John Atcherley “considered that death had resulted from intemperate habits, and the jury returned a verdict of ‘Died from excessive drinking.’”

Liverpool Dock Board office from Canning Graving Dock

The final example of this sort of case from Doctor Atcherley’s ‘casebook’ involved a 37-year-old sailor named Patrick O’Connor. On Wednesday 22 September 1886, after arriving in Liverpool from London, he “went to a house of ill-fame in Gore-street, in a very drunken state.” He remained there the following day, and after vomiting “very much” he drank “various glasses of whisky.” On Thursday evening he called for a doctor, but died before medical assistance could be given. From what he saw, and from what he was told of the case, Dr John Atcherley “had not the slightest doubt that the man had died from excessive drinking.”


Picture credits. Tasley church: Photo © copyright Row17, taken from Geograph; adapted, used, and made available for re-use under a Creative Commons licence. Entry in The British Medical Directory, 1853 (composite image from pages 171-2), out of copyright. Arms of the Royal College of Surgeons: image from Calendar of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, published 1880 and therefore out of copyright. Dock Board offices from the Canning Graving Dock, Liverpool: From a painting by J Hamilton Hay in Liverpool (at the Internet Archive website), published 1907 and out of copyright.


References.

[1] Information from Family New Testament and Prayer Book received from Sarah Williams via Barbara Lang.
[2] Tasley, Shropshire, parish register covering 1810. Entry for baptism of John Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1898), Shropshire Parish Registers. Diocese of Hereford, Volume I, Tasley. Page 35. Copies viewed at the Internet Archive and Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P01687-1, Film 95251.
[3] J E Auden (1906), Shrewsbury School Register, 1734-1908. Page 45. Copy viewed at the Internet Archive.
[4] St Leonard, Bridgnorth, Shropshire, marriage register covering 1833. Entry for John Atcherley and Mary Morris. Copies viewed at Shropshire Archives and at Findmypast – Shropshire Marriages. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch M08582-1, Film 502913, 510655.
[5] Berrow’s Worcester Journal, issue 6783, 10 Jan 1833, page 3. “Married.”
[6] Jackson’s Oxford Journal, 12 Jan 1833. “Married.”
[7] Sylvanus Urban (1837), The Gentleman’s Magazine, volume VII (New Series), July to December 1837, page 322. “Clergy Deceased.” Copy viewed at Google Books.
[8] Clergy of the Church of England Database (website, accessed 26 Jun 2015).
[9] St Leonard, Bridgnorth, Shropshire, parish register covering 1803. Entry dated 14 Mar 1803 for baptism of “Mary Daughter of the Revd Mr. Joseph Morris & Mary his Wife”. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Transcript viewed at Shropshire Archives. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch C08582-1, Film 502913, 510655.
[10] St Peter, Liverpool, Lancashire, baptism register covering 1833. Entry for Eleanor Vickers Atcherley. Copy viewed at Ancestry – Lancashire, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1911. Abstract at Lancashire OPC website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch I02046-5, Film 93880, Ref ID v 21 p 268.
[11] 1841 census of England and Wales. Piece 565, book 1, folio 26, page 1.
[12] 1851 census of England and Wales. Piece 2181, folio 443, page 15.
[13] 1861 census of England and Wales. Piece 2687, folio 88, page 7.
[14] 1871 census of England and Wales. Piece 3794, folio 34, page 8.
[15] 1881 census of England and Wales. Piece 3635, folio 118, page 7.
[16] Birth of John Atcherley registered at Liverpool, September quarter 1838; volume 20, page 408.
[17] St Peter, Liverpool, Lancashire, baptism register covering 1838. Entry for John Atcherley. Copy viewed at Ancestry – Lancashire, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1911. Abstract at Lancashire OPC website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch I02053-5, Film 93882, Reference yr 1838-1838 p 163.
[18] Death of John Atcherley registered at Liverpool, March quarter 1839; volume 20, page 406 or 416.
[19] St Michael, Liverpool, Lancashire, burial register covering 1839. Entry for John Atcherley. Copy viewed at Ancestry – Lancashire, England, Deaths and Burials, 1813-1986. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch B00096-3, Film 1068955.
[20] Mr Churchill (publisher) (1851), An Annual Retrospect of New Works and New Editions, page 292. Snippet viewed at Google Books.
[21] The British Medical Directory, 1853. Page 171. Copy viewed at the Internet Archive.
[22] Pigot’s Directory (1834), page 341 (Liverpool &c.)
[23] Liverpool Mercury, issue 1179, 6 Dec 1833, page 1. Also published 13 Dec 1833, 27 Dec 1833, 10 Jan 1834. Copies viewed at Findmypast – British Newspapers 1710-1953.
[24] London Gazette, issue 19454, 3 January 1837, page 18.
[25] Morning Chronicle, 12 Jan 1856, page 3. “Royal College of Surgeons.”
[26] General Medical Council (1859), Medical Register. Copy viewed at Ancestry – UK Medical Registers, 1859-1959.
[27] General Medical Council (1863), Medical Register. Copy viewed at Ancestry – UK Medical Registers, 1859-1959.
[28] Royal College of Surgeons (1865), Calendar of the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Page 113. Copy viewed at Mocavo. Also later editions.
[29] Liverpool Mercury, 28 Nov 1851. “Valuable Freehold Property.”
[30] Gore’s Directory of Liverpool, 1860. Page 19. See: Directories Part 2.
[31] Slater’s Lancashire Directory, 1869. Page 435. See: Directories Part 2.
[32] Death of Mary Atcherley registered at Liverpool, June quarter 1870; volume 8b, page 95; age given as 65.
[33] Liverpool Mercury, issue 6925, 5 Apr 1870. “Deaths.”
[34] Toxteth Park Cemetery Inscriptions (website, accessed 26 June 2015).
[35] See: Lancashire MIs.
[36] Index to Toxteth Park Cemetery 1870 the consecrated part. At: Toxteth Park Cemetery website (accessed 26 Jun 2015).
[37] Kelly’s Directory of Liverpool 1881. Page 653. See: Directories Part 2.
[38] B.A.A.S (1838), List of Members of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. Page 18. Copy viewed at Hathi Trust website.
[39] Anthropological Society of London (1867), The Anthropological Review, volume V, page ccviii. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[40] Masonic Mirror, no. 11, 12 Jan 1859, page 75. Copy viewed at the Masonic Library website.
[41] Liverpool Mercury, 24 Feb 1852, page 5. “Lecture on Chemistry.”
Liverpool Mercury, 1 Oct 1841, page 8. Copy viewed at Findmypast – British Newspapers 1710-1953 (search term Atcher ley).
[42] Liverpool Mercury, 21 May 1852, page 8.
[43] Liverpool Mercury, 14 Jun 1856, page 5. “Sudden Deaths.”
[44] Liverpool Mercury, issue 4652, 7 Jan 1863, page 6. “Coroner’s Inquests.”
[45] Source: Liverpool Mercury, 27 Sep 1886, page 8. “Coroner’s Inquests.”

Hope and Hester Atcherley’s school days

Sisters Mary Elizabeth Hope Atcherley and Hester Mary Eleanor Atcherley – Hope and Hester – attended The Queen’s School in Chester from around 1904 until just before the First World War. Thanks to the online archive of the school’s magazine Have Mynde, it is possible to follow the Atcherley sisters’ progress through those years and share some of the experiences of their school days.

Hope and Hester were daughters of solicitor Richard Topping Beverley Atcherley and his wife Caroline Mary Wynne (nee Ffoulkes). They were born at Hatch End in Pinner, Middlesex, Hope in 1894 and Hester in 1895. The family later moved to Caroline’s home city of Chester. A newspaper article mentioning “Mr. R. Atcherley, of 9, Stanley Place” indicates that they were established there by November 1903. Other sources dating from 1904 onwards give the Atcherleys’ address as 6 Stanley Place.

It was not until 1906 that the name Atcherley was first seen in Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual. Every year, the magazine reported on the “successes … gained by Pupils of the Queen’s School during the past year” in Public Examinations. In the 1905 Local Centre Examination of the Associated Boards of the Royal College of Music and the Royal Academy of Music, both M. E. H. Atcherley (Hope) and H. M. E. Atcherley (Hester) passed in the Elementary Division, Piano. Hope had also passed in Division I of the Royal Drawing Society of Great Britain and Ireland examination, in June 1905, and I suspect she was the “H. Atcherley” who received a Grade I certificate from the London Institute for the Advancement of Plain Needlework that year.

The Queen’s School today. Photo by Jean Mottershead.

The results of these examinations continued to feature one or both of the Atcherley sisters’ names in most of the ensuing editions of Have Mynde up to that of 1912. Gradually, Hope and Hester moved up the divisions or grades of the exams, sometimes with a pass, sometimes with honours. In the 1910-11 school year Hope and Hester were both successful in the Higher Division (Piano) of the music examinations. In the same year Hope gained a certificate at Grade V of the needlework exam. During the following year Hester passed in Division V of the Royal Drawing Society of Great Britain and Ireland examination, while Hope gained honours in the same Division and passed in Division VI.

The names of both Hope and Hester also appeared from time to time in connection with the school’s annual distribution of prizes. The 1907 event took place in the Town Hall on 7 November, when Lady Grosvenor distributed the prizes. Hope Atcherley, then of Form III Lower in the Middle School, received a prize for Scripture. In 1908, she was presented with prizes for both Scripture and Sewing, while Hester was recognised in the category of “Distinctions in Examinations”. Other pupils were given prizes for Mathematics, Arithmetic, Natural Science & Geography, French & Latin, German, English Language & Literature, English & History, Drawing, Music (Pianoforte), Cricket, Hockey, Tennis and Games (General Excellence).

Further prizes were received by the girls in 1910 (Hope Atcherley, for Sewing), and in 1912 (Hester Atcherley, for Scripture). Hope, meanwhile, also received recognition for her botanical drawings in the Royal Drawing Society’s Annual Exhibitions of Paintings. She was commended in the Second Class in 1909-10, received an award in the Fourth Class the following year, and was again commended in the Second Class in 1911-12.

The Atcherley sisters seem not to have excelled in sporting activities. A report in the 1911 issue of Have Mynde shows that during the 1910 season of the school’s tennis club, Hope Atcherley had participated in the “Inter-Form Tournament for Miss Clay’s trophy” which took place on 27 and 28 July. With M Finchett for IV Form Upper, Hope beat B Stewart and M Swire of Form V Lower in the first round, 6—3, 6—1. In the second round however, Atcherley and Finchett lost to the Form III Upper team, 6—1, 6—1. I have found no other references to either Hope or Hester in connection with the school’s tennis, hockey or cricket matches.

As for academic subjects, in the July 1913 examinations of the Oxford and Cambridge Joint Board, Hester Atcherley gained Higher Certificates in Botany and French. I have found no indication of any similar achievement by Hope Atcherley.

A fascinating insight into the minds of the young ladies of the Queen’s School is provided by the following account of the School’s Debating Society meeting of 20 February 1913. Proposer of the motion ‘England is declining’  was “H. Atcherley” (Hope, or Hester?).

The Proposer opened the debate by saying that English character was beyond all doubt deteriorating: hardships were invariably shunned—even corporal punishment was strictly limited; religion was becoming ineffective, as shewn by the Disestablishment Bill; manners were deteriorating, (the men being discourteous and the women unwomanly). Patriotism was a thing of the past; the Colonies, and even Ireland, were demanding self-government; in fact, the Empire was simply falling to pieces.

The Opposer replied by saying that character was much improved; drunkenness, at least, was no longer a common vice; moreover Britons were, to foreigners, examples of truth and courage, and were taught self-reliance by their games. With regard to self-government for the Colonies, it was only natural that, as growing countries, they should require these; nor would it be to England’s benefit that they should be entirely dependent on her. The Empire was perfectly patriotic and united. …

E. Brotherton here renewed the question of religion, and how greatly it was falling off.

The Proposer deplored the absence of Church-going, and the fact that people were no longer compelled to go. …

An eager discussion followed as to the respective merits of French and English aviators; but here the President rose to call upon the Proposer to sum up. In spite of her convincing speech, the motion that ‘England is declining’ was negatived by twelve votes to six.

Both Hope and Hester became members of The Queen’s School Association of Past and Present Pupils. Hester joined the association’s committee for 1912-13 and served again the following academic year. Hope was listed as a member of the association in the 1913 edition of Have Mynde, but from 1914 both sisters’ names appeared in the list of members. By 1916 Hope was a life member, having paid the required sum of one guinea. Hester was elected Assistant Secretary in 1914 and again 1915. She may also have been the “H. Atcherley” elected as one of two Honorary Secretaries in 1917, but she had not paid her subscription for the 1917-18 year.

It was not only as members of the Association of Past and Present Pupils that the names of Hope and Hester Atcherley appeared in Have Mynde from 1915 to 1918. These were of course years during which the First World War was raging – and the Atcherley sisters were both very active on the Home Front during that time. In this connection, the final words of this article by Hester Atcherley, published in the 1913 edition of Have Mynde, had greater meaning than Hester could possibly have imagined at the time:

The First Aid and Sick Nursing Classes.

During the Winter and Spring Terms, we received an interesting course of First Aid and Sick Nursing Lectures, Kindly given by Mrs. Drinkwater. The classes were open to all girls from the Upper IV. upwards, and about twenty-six joined, and the science room proved ideal for our work.

It was, indeed, surprising to find how little we knew concerning the treatment of quite slight accidents. Most of us came thinking we could pride ourselves on knowing how to treat a case of nose-bleeding. But we soon discovered our mistake. We were all very keen and rapidly made good progress, and Mrs. Drinkwater expressed her approval of our zeal.

I think we nearly all liked the last part of each lesson best, when we were shown the uses of the triangular bandage and afterwards put them into practice ourselves. It is such an unassuming bandage, and yet can be turned into innumerable shapes as the case requires. At first, it provided us with some amusement too: the sight of our friends, a moment ago hale and hearty, transformed into sufferers with broken arms and fractured jaws proved too much for our feelings. But this frivolity soon worked off, and we became serious and hard-working.

The lectures came all too soon to an end, and we found ourselves to face to face with an examination. We had all done our best and revised most diligently for this examination, and yet most of us dreaded it. Somehow, it seemed so different from other Examinations. It was the not knowing quite what to expect that alarmed us. But all is well that ends well, for, happily to say, every candidate passed the examination.

Then, during Spring Term, came a series of classes on a first course of Sick Nursing. On the whole, these were not as interesting as those on First Aid. There did not seem to be so much scope for putting our knowledge into practice. The roller bandages were much more exciting than the triangular, the only drawback being the wearisome rolling up after each time.

It would be unfair not to give a word of praise to the small children from the lower Forms who, in many cases, acted as patients. They were very good, for our exactions were great. In one case we had a very good little patient, who allowed herself to be tucked up in bed, and lay motionless while each pupil made her bed.

We are now anxiously awaiting an examination, and hoping we shall not forget what to do when the time comes. 


Picture credits. The Queen’s School, Chester: Photo by Jean Mottershead, taken from her Flickr photostream and used under a Creative Commons Licence. Map of the British Empire: Image from page 6 of History of England and the British Empire, published 1893; taken from the British Library Flickr photostream, no known copyright restrictions. Roller bandage: Image from page 20 of Minor surgery and bandaging,published 1902; taken from Internet Archive, out of copyright.


References.

[1] Birth of Elizabeth Hope Atcherley registered at Hendon, March quarter 1894; volume 3a, page 158.
[2] Birth of Hester Atcherley registered at Hendon, June quarter 1895; volume 3a, page 164.
1901 census of England and Wales. Piece 1210, folio 51, page 38.
[3] Tamworth Herald, 14 Nov 1903, page 6. The Hyde Child Murder.
[4] London Gazette, issue 27661, 25 Mar 1904, page 1972.
[5] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1906), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, May 1906.
[6] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1907), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, May 1907.
[7] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1908), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, May 1908.
[8] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1909), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, July 1909.
[9] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1910), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, July 1910.
[10] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1911), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, July 1911.
[11] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1912), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, July 1912.
[12] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1913), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, July 1913.
[13] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1914), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, July 1914.
[14] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1915), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, July 1915.
[15] Beatrice Elizabeth Clay (ed.) (1918), Have Mynde, The Queen’s School Annual, June 1918.
Note: All digitised copies of Have Mynde can be accessed from the Have Mynde Archive.

The disappearance of David Atcherley

Yesterday, one of my Google searches for an incorrect spelling of the surname Atcherley led me to a fantastic find on YouTube: a short British Pathé film featuring Air Vice Marshall David Francis William Atcherley. It is the first film of David that I have found – and it may also be the final film in which this Atcherley twin appeared. Less than 4 months after the footage was captured, David disappeared without trace while flying over the Mediterranean Sea between Egypt and Cyprus.

Having served as Basil Embry’s Senior Air Staff Officer at Fighter Command from 21 Jan 1950, in January 1952 AVM David Atcherley took up a new post as Air Officer Commanding (AOC) of 205 Group, Middle East Air Force, in Egypt. He became the first AOC to arrive by jet when taking over a command.

David set up home in a houseboat, which he described as “large and comfortable and very cool in the summer.” His work in Egypt’s Suez Canal Zone involved a lot of office work and “high-powered meetings” but also provided plenty of opportunities for flying. In one of his letters home he wrote:

I’m holding a big air exercise from Tuesday to Saturday next week. We’ve got quite a big air force here at the moment and I thought it would be a good thing  to keep them occupied. I hope they’ll enjoy it.

The big air exercise David referred to was most likely ‘Hightime’, which was the subject of the above-mentioned British Pathé film. I found this gem after searching online for the word “Atchedey”, having noticed that that the letters ‘r’ and ‘l’ used consecutively (“rl”) might in some situations be interpreted as a ‘d’. (See Lost in transcription for more misspellings of the surname Atcherley). The film shows David getting into his aircraft (from about 47 seconds in to 1:10) and, right at the end (from about 3:43), talking to his officers in the Operations Room.


British Pathé film from YouTube.

David Atcherley’s last letter home was sent on Sunday 1 June 1952. He told of his planned move to “the big house” the following Saturday, and of a party he was going to give for senior local RAF and Army personnel so that they could all get to know each other. He also said:

I’m off to Cyprus tomorrow morning, merely for the fly. I’ll deliver a letter to the Air Commodore, have lunch and fly back here in the evening. It’s Whit Monday tomorrow, a holiday and nothing much to do locally unless you sail. 

It appears that either David’s plans changed after he wrote, or that he decided to make another visit to Cyprus on Saturday 7 June. Either way, at about 6 o’clock on the morning of that fateful day the Air Vice Marshall set off from RAF Fayid for Nicosia in a Meteor PR 10 jet, WB.161. David Atcherley was never seen again, and the last that was heard from him was by radio, 2 minutes after take-off, when he checked on the weather conditions at Nicosia.

Later that day, two messages were sent “by secure means” from Middle East Air Force headquarters to the Air Ministry in London, both headed FLASH SECRET. One of them read as follows:

Regret Atcherley overdue beyond maximum endurance on lone flight to Cyprus this morning in a Meteor 10. Full search and rescue measures already in operation. Shall extend air search to Southern Areas of Turkey if necessary. Foreign Office may like to know this.

Para. 2. Understand he did not take dinghy pack or Mae West and had ejector seat taken out before leaving.

Para. 3. Normal casualty reporting action will be taken by 205 Group as necessary but feel you and C.A.S. will like to have this stop press news at once for personal information. 

(‘Mae West’ was the popular nickname for the inflatable life-jacket used by RAF personnel at that time.)

Further messages to the Air Ministry followed on 8 June. It was confirmed that an “intensive air and sea search” had taken place during daylight hours for two days running, but the results had been “entirely negative”. The search operation had begun 40 minutes after David was overdue at Nicosia, with the despatch of Meteor and Vampire jets followed by Lincolns and Valettas, and then by Mosquitos and Beaufighters. Lancasters from Malta also joined in. In total, 50 search sorties were flown from the Canal Zone, and a large number from Cyprus. Searches were made by forces from Turkey, Lebanon and Israel too, and by an American aircraft. In addition, naval vessels were engaged.

Finally, on 10 June 1952, the Middle East Air Force (MEAF) despatched the following message: “Land search in Port Said area and small area in Lebanon continued on June 9 with negative results. All search action has now been discontinued and regret there can be little hope of Atcherley’s survival.”

On 12 June, J H Barnes wrote to David’s twin, Air Vice Marshall Richard Atcherley:

Sir,

I am commanded by the Air Council to inform you that they have learned with profound regret that the search for the aircraft piloted by your brother, Air Vice-Marshall D.F.W. Atcherley, C.B., C.B.E., D.S.O., D.F.C., on 7th June has proved unsuccessful.

The Air Council, recalling your brother’s long record of distinguished service, desire me to extend to your parents and to yourself an expression of their deepest sympathy.

To this day, the circumstances in which David Atcherley disappeared remain a mystery. Weather conditions and visibility were good, and David’s Meteor was fully fuelled giving him 2¾ hours flying time at height. An initial suggestion was “unconsciousness of Pilot through oxygen failure”, and in a letter to the Marshall of the RAF dated 12 June 1952, Air Chief Marshall Sir Arthur Sanders of the MEAF wrote: “I am afraid the only conclusion is that he went straight in and down into the sea, probably through lack of oxygen. The sickening thing is that we have no real clue at all as to what happened.”

Sir Theodore McEvoy later stated that David had said to him during a conversation some three weeks before he was lost, “What do you know about the instruments in these aeroplanes? I can’t see them!” He suggested that as David never wore spectacles when flying, his inability to read his flight instruments might have played a part in his disappearance. The Pathé news footage of David getting into his aircraft during the ‘Hightime’ exercise certainly shows that he was not wearing glasses on that occasion.

Meteor PR 10

With his own letter to the Air Marshall of 12 June 1952, Sir Arthur Sanders enclosed a number of additional messages expressing sympathy and loss, which had been sent to him by the local British Embassy and by representatives of the armed forces in the Canal Zone. One was from the Commander-in-Chief of the Middle East Land Forces, General Sir Brian H Robertson, who wrote:

Atcherley had only been with us a few months. Right from the start he captured the affection and admiration of my officers to a most remarkable degree. I had never met him before myself, but from the moment when I first shook hands with him I knew that I liked him.

I have heard men say of him, without meaning to be unkind, that he was crazy, if so it was the craziness of real heroism. He was a man of whom your Service can be immensely proud. We in the Army are terribly sad at his loss and shall always remember our association with him with gratitude and great respect.

Of course, the man who felt David Atcherley’s loss the most was his twin brother Richard. He had wanted to fly out and join in the search operation for David, but this was very sensibly ruled out by Basil Embry. To complement the private family memorial service in York, Richard organised a public service in London which was attended by high-ranking representatives from all three of the armed forces, various dignitaries, about 120 officers and wives from Fighter Command, and 50 from other RAF Commands. A further service held at Ismailia in Egypt gave Richard the opportunity to fly, alone and in a Meteor, the same course that David had set out on but never completed. John Pudney, the Atcherley twins biographer, later summed up the impact on Richard thus:

The loss of David was more profound in its impact than that of any other blood relation. Close friends observed the profundity of the shock, the fracture of the pattern of a lifetime. … no words can describe the sense of desolation and loneliness at losing one whom he had lightly described as his ‘better half.’


Picture credits. Eastern Mediterranean, showing RAF Fayid and Nicosia: Based on a public domain image from Wikimedia Commons. Meteor PR 10: Photo, from Flight magazine, 27 May 1955, page 729, taken from Flight Global archive, which states “we’re positively encouraging you to link to, copy and paste from, and contribute to the development of this unique record of aerospace and aviation history”.


References

[1] John Pudney (1960), A Pride of Unicorns. Pages 217-221.
[2] Royal Air Force (RAF) Officers 1939-1945. At: World War II Unit Histories and Officers (website, accessed 22 Jun 2015).
[3] Air Vice Marshal D F W Atcherley. At: Air of Authority – A History of RAF Organisation (website, accessed 22 Jun 2015).
[4] The National Archives, Kew, item ref AIR 8/1688: Air Vice Marshal D.F.W.Atcherley’s disappearance between Fayid and Cyprus and subsequent search June 1952. Indexed at TNA Discovery catalogue.
[5] London Gazette, number 38980 (supplement), 28 July 1950, page 3939.

Glover, mercer, drapers – Roger and Elizabeth Atcherley

The first Atcherley to be listed in a trade directory appears to have been Roger, a mercer and draper in Whitchurch, Shropshire in the late 1700s. Among those Atcherleys claiming second place (and certainly the first female Atcherley to be so listed) was none other than Roger’s wife, Elizabeth.

Roger Atcherley, who was named after his father, was the youngest of nine children. Born on 9 June 1743, he was baptised a week later on 16 June at Shrewsbury St Chad. Although his father was married to Ann (nee Thomas), the parish register named his parents as “Roger & Joan”. This was presumably an error on the part of the clerk as I have found no other evidence to suggest that Roger Atcherley junior was born out of wedlock.

Roger Atcherley senior, a tanner, died some 12 years after his youngest son’s birth and was buried at Shrewsbury St Chad on 16 December 1755. A little over a year later, on 16 February 1757, the widowed Ann Atcherley apprenticed 14-year-old Roger to James Burley of Shrewsbury, a glover, at a cost of £20. Burley was a member of the Shrewsbury Glovers’ Company (also known as the Glovers’ & Skinners’ Company), and was a Warden of that trade guild in 1764 and 1765.

In setting Roger as an apprentice, Ann Atcherley’s goal was to ensure that he would learn a trade which would provide him with a secure future. In this Ann was successful, although Roger did not remain a glover. Nor did he stay in Shrewsbury. The next record I have found in which Roger features is that of his marriage, on 3 January 1768, to Elizabeth Scripture. The wedding took place at the church of St Alkmund in Whitchurch, Shropshire (pictured right). Roger lived and traded in that town for the rest of his life.

Unlike her husband, Elizabeth was a native of Whitchurch. With her unusual surname it was quite easy to find a record of her baptism, although for some time an element of doubt remained as to whether or not the record I had found really did relate to Roger’s wife. The reason for this was that Elizabeth Scripture was baptised on 7 April 1729, over 14 years before her husband was born.

(It appears that Elizabeth had two sisters, Ann, who was baptised at Whitchurch on 2 July 1726 and married Samuel Trevor at nearby Prees on 8 June 1752; and Mary, for whom I have found no baptism record, but whose marriage to George Jackson of Malpas, Cheshire, was witnessed by Elizabeth Scripture at Whitchurch on 15 October 1758. The girls’ parents, John Scripture and Elizabeth, neé Barrow, were buried at Whitchurch on 23 January 1736/7 and 2 March 1786 respectively.)

Most of the marriages for which I have seen records during my family history research – certainly those relating to first marriages – have involved men and women of around the same age, but usually with the groom being older than the bride. Nuptials between a man of 24 and a woman of 38 most certainly do not fit the typical pattern. Elizabeth’s age at the time of her wedding might go some way to explaining why she and Roger only had two children. The baptisms of their son John and daughter Mary Atcherley took place at Whitchurch on 22 November 1768 and 16 October 1773 respectively.

Although the record of John Atcherley’s baptism gives no information beyond the names of parents and child, the entry in the parish register for Mary’s baptism shows that the family was then living in High Street, Whitchurch. An indication that Roger must then have been trading successfully in that town is that he was one of 32 men of Whitchurch who formed a society for pursuing and prosecuting felons. This society was announced in the Shrewsbury Chronicle of 10 July:

Whitchurch, Shropshire, June 24, 1773.
Whereas divers Persons guilty of Felony, Burglary, Grand and Petit Larceny, frequently escape punishment, either through fear of the expence which may attend their prosecution, or for want of an immediate and vigorous pursuit, or from a principle of ill-timed lenity and moderation,
Notice is therefore hereby given,
That in order to prevent in some degree the evil aforesaid, We, whose names are hereunto subscribed, inhabitants of the parish of Whitchurch aforesaid, have formed ourselves into a Society for the purpose of raising a sufficient fund to defray the expence of pursuing, detecting, and prosecuting with the utmost rigour, such as shall be guilty or shall be suspected to be guilty of the crimes or offences above specified, against the person or property of any member of this society. …

A notice published in another newspaper (Chester’s Adam’s Weekly Courant) on 4 May 1779 shows that “Mr. Roger Atcherley, Mercer” had lately been the holder of “A very convenient freehold messuage, or dwelling-house, with the Shop and Appurtenances thereunto belonging, pleasantly and advantageously situated for carrying out any Business in the High-street, in Whitchurch”. The property was to be let, so it appears that Roger may have moved to alternative premises around that time. Further particulars of the property were to be obtained from a Mrs Trevor of Whitchurch – possibly Roger’s sister-in-law Ann.

The 1784 edition of Bailey’s British Directory; or, Merchant’s and Trader’s Useful Companion listed Roger Atcherley as a mercer and draper in Whitchurch. This is, as I have already mentioned, the earliest listing for a member of the Atcherley family which I have found so far in any trade directory. (See Directories Part 1.)

Bailey’s British Directory did not give an address for Roger in Whitchurch, but he was most likely still trading in the town’s High Street. When Robert B Jones, a bookseller, stationer and bookbinder of High Street, Whitchurch, announced in 1791 that he was “removed across the street” his new shop was said to be “next door to Mr. Atcherley’s.”

Despite the fact that he was much younger than his wife, Roger Atcherley predeceased Elizabeth. He was buried at the church where he had married and where his children had been baptised, Whitchurch St Alkmund, on 27 April 1793. He was 49 years old.

Although she was aged 64 when she lost her husband, Elizabeth Atcherley evidently took over the family business. She was listed as a draper amongst the “Traders &c.” of Whitchurch, Shropshire in volume 4 of The Universal British Directory of Trade, Commerce, and Manufacture  (published around 1800, see extract, left).

This directory, published some four decades before the census of 1841, provides a fairly detailed picture of the town in which Elizabeth Atcherley and her children then lived. Whitchurch was described as “a pleasant and populous market-town”, 12 miles from Nantwich, 20 from Chester and Newport, 22 from Newcastle under Lyme, and 161 miles from London. The town had coach services to Birmingham, Manchester and London, and mail services to Malpas and Chester, and to and from London.

In addition to the gentry and the clergy who headed the list of the principal inhabitants of Whitchurch, there were other residents undertaking a wide range of occupations: an architect, attorneys, an auctioneer, bakers, booksellers (including the aforementioned Robert Jones), braziers, breeches makers, a bricklayer, butchers, cabinet makers, chandlers (including tallow chandlers), cheese factors, a china shop proprietor, clock (and watch) makers, a collar maker, a confectioner, coopers, curriers, a “Chymist and Druggist”, excise officers, farmers, grocers, flax dressers, a gardener, a habit maker, hairdressers, thehead of a School for Ladies (possibly at Ellesmere House, pictured right), a heel maker, a hosier, hucksters, ironmongers, joiners, a liquor merchant, maltsters, a mantua maker, a mason, mercers, milliners, a “nailor”, a plasterer, two plumbers and glaziers, rope makers, saddlers, shoe makers, a sieve maker, smiths, a stay maker, a stocking weaver, surgeons, “taylors”, a timber merchant, a tanner, a turner, an umbrella maker, victuallers (there were no less than 23 public houses), wheelwrights and writing masters. There were also other drapers, some listed as linen and woollen drapers.

This, then, was the town in which Elizabeth Atcherley was trading – and the town in which she died. Notice of Elizabeth’s death was included in the May 1800 edition of The Monthly Magazine (albeit with her surname given as Alcherley). “Elizabeth Atcherley Widow”, aged 71, was buried at Whitchurch St Alkmund on 20 February 1800.

Roger and Elizabeth’s daughter Mary Atcherley followed her parents to the grave on 30 March 1802. Aged 28 (the burial register knocked a year off her true age), Mary was unmarried. Her brother John was wed the following year (one of the witnesses was Ann Trevor, possibly John’s maternal aunt) and through him the Atcherley family continued to trade in Whitchurch. John Atcherley was a victualler rather than a mercer or draper.  In time however, one of John’s sons would take up the trade carried on by Roger and Elizabeth Atcherley in Whitchurch.


Picture credits. Whitchurch St Alkmund: Photo © Copyright Carol Walker, taken from Geograph, adapted, used, and made available for re-use under a Creative Commons Licence. Extract from the Universal British Directory of Trade, Commerce, and Manufacture, published circa 1800 and therefore out of copyright. Ellesmere House, Whitchurch: Photo © Copyright David Dixon, taken from Geograph, adapted, used, and made available for re-use under a Creative Commons Licence.


References.

[1] St Chad, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, parish register covering 1743. Entry for baptism of Roger Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Marriages. Abstract in Shropshire Parish Register Society (1916), Shropshire Parish Registers. Diocese of Lichfield, Volume XVI (St. Chad’s, Shrewsbury), page 1069 viewed at the Internet Archive and at Mel Lockie’s website. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch P01575-2, Film 908236.
[2] The National Archives, Kew, Reference IR 1/53 folio 28, page 16 (Board of Stamps: Apprenticeship Books). Copy viewed at Ancestry – Register of Duties Paid for Apprentices’ Indentures, 1710-1811.
[3] C H Drinkwater (1887), Shrewsbury Trade Guilds. The Glovers’ Company. In: Transactions of the Shropshire Archaeological and Natural History Society. Volume X. Page 43. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[4] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, marriage register covering 1768. Entry for Roger Atcherley and Elizabeth Scripture. Copies viewed at Shropshire Archives and at Findmypast – Shropshire Marriages. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch M03756-1, Film 501818, 503826, 503827, 510683, 510684.
[5] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1729. Entry for baptism of Elizabeth Scripture. Copy viewed at Shropshire Archives. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch C03756-2, Film 510683, 510684.
[6] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1726. Entry for baptism of Ann Scripture. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms (surname indexed as Scriphure).
[7] Prees, Shropshire, parish register covering 1752. Entry for marriage of Samuel Trevor and Ann Scripture. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Marriages.
[8] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, marriage register covering 1758. Entry for marriage of George Jackson and Mary Scripture. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Marriages.
[9] FamilySearch shows marriage of John Scripture and Elizabeth Barrow. Film 1655540, Digital folder 4012056, Image 296.
[10] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1736/7. Entry for burial of John Scripture. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Burials.
[11] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1786. Entry for burial of Elizabeth Scripture, widow. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Burials.
[12] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1768. Entry for baptism of John Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Transcript viewed at Shropshire Archives. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch C03756-2, Film 510683, 510684.
[13] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1773. Entry for baptism of Mary Acherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Baptisms. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch C03756-2, Film 510683, 510684.
[14] Shrewsbury Chronicle, 10 Jul 1773, page 2. Copy viewed at Findmypast – British Newspapers 1710-1953 (search term Atcherlcy).
[15] Adams Weekly Courant (Chester), issue 2424, 4 May 1779, page 2.
[16] Bailey’s British Directory; or, Merchant’s and Trader’s Useful Companion for the year 1784. Indexed at Ancestry – U.K. and U.S. Directories, 1680-1830.
[17] Chester Chronicle, 1 Apr 1791, page 3.
[18] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1793. Entry for burial of Roger Atcherley. Copies viewed at Shropshire Archives and at Findmypast – Shropshire Burials.
[19] The Universal British Directory of Trade, Commerce, and Manufacture (circa 1800), page 745. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[20] The Monthly Magazine, No. 58 (No. 4 of Vol. 9), 1 May 1800, page 305. Copy viewed at Google Books.
[21] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1800. Entry for burial of Elizabeth Atcherley. Copies viewed at Shropshire Archives and at Findmypast – Shropshire Burials.
[22] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, parish register covering 1802. Entry for burial of Mary Atcherley. Copy viewed at Findmypast – Shropshire Burials.
[23] St Alkmund, Whitchurch, Shropshire, marriage register. Entry dated 20 Jan 1803 for John Atcherly and Martha Furmston. Copies viewed at Shropshire Archives and at Findmypast – Shropshire Marriages. Transcript viewed at Shropshire Archives. Indexed at FamilySearch, Batch M03756-1, Film 501818, 503826, 503827, 510683, 510684.